Pitchfork’s Review of the Hall and Oates Box Set Is 762 Words, and Not One of Them Is “Rich” or “Girl”

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11/19/2009 12:30 PM |

You have no idea how many times Yahoo Answers has refused to respond to my question, Dear Yahoo Answers, are Hall and Oates in love? Sincerely, L Magazine Film Editor Mark Asch, BFA.
  • You have no idea how many times Yahoo Answers has refused to respond to my question, “Dear Yahoo Answers, are Hall and Oates in love? Sincerely, L Magazine Film Editor Mark Asch, BFA.”

Once upon a time, of course, it was not cool to like Hall & Oates, but historical distance, coupled with the fact of the internet ensuring that nothing stays underground for long and thus making “indie” essentially just another genre of mainstream music, has made it much easier to “respect motherfucking craft when you hear it”, as an alt-weekly music critic once said about a Taylor Swift record at no risk of professional disapprobation.

Anyway that is a very brief historical summary of why Pitchfork’s Douglas Wolk is reviewing Do What You Want, Be What You Are: The Music of Daryl Hall and John Oates today. He wisely leaves larger issues of taste, irony and history to idiot big-picture bloggers, and contextualizes the hits (and misses) within the style of the times. He gives it a 4.8, but that seems to have more to do with the selection than anything else, because we all know that it’s ok to like Hall and Oates now, and not even ironically. Postmodernism wins!

Also, Nina Simone’s cover of “Rich Girl”, also.

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