Why Your Relationship Won’t Work Out, According to the Most-Emailed Stories on NYTimes.com

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01/19/2010 4:02 PM |

Sometimes, though, a shared committment to environmentalism can be the foundation of a lasting relationship.
  • Sometimes, though, a shared committment to environmentalism can be the foundation of a lasting relationship.

“As awareness of environmental concerns has grown, therapists say they are seeing a rise in bickering between couples and family members over the extent to which they should change their lives to save the planet.”

What a good trend piece, in the science section of yesterday’s Times, about how disagreements about lifestyle choices tinged with politics and morality have been observed to put stress on relationships. “I am not eating cod or rockfish,” is an actual quote from this article, from a guy explaining to a stranger why he is probably going to break up with his girlfriend. Can anything save this relationship, other than diabetes?

This article is currently the second-most emailed on nytimes.com. Third most is this story, about how women are more likely than ever to be better-educated and make more than their husbands. Which the reporter, Sam Robers, for some reason frames as a dating story? About how hard it is to date, when you’re a well-educated successful woman—even though “women with college degrees are still more likely to marry today than less educated women,” according the article itself. Here is a fact, and here are some countervailing anecdotes: which do you trust?!?

Anyway, anecdotally based upon the respective number of people who sent these articles to their friends with the added note “remind you of anybody? lol”, it appears that more guys are breaking up with their girlfriends because of the environment than because of money.