Space Nerds Protest in Times Square For Right to Nerd-Out Over Space Minivan Shuttle

04/16/2010 12:23 PM |

space shuttle minivans
  • Space-parking is expensive.

It is a well known true fact that New York City contains at least one coherent subset of every conceivable interest group in the entire country, from Fruitarian Nihilists to San Jose Sharks fans. So it’s no surprise that a bunch of nerds dressed up in space-related regalia (from Kirk to Boba Fett to Bill Paxton in one of those “real world” space movies) and marched on Times Square, America’s spiritual center of space-related grass roots action.

The point of this particular action was to convince NASA to give New York one of three available Space Shuttles (the Yugo, the Starbucks, and the Pillager) to have as a museum piece at the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum, as we say goodbye to the Space Shuttle era (which will one day be known as the Soccer Mom Minivan Era of spaceflight).

Poignantly, the child of one of the nerds (who was dressed as Cillian Murphy’s character in Sunshine) said he wanted to be either an astronaut, a paleontologist or a veterinarian when he grows up. He will be none of those things.

3 Comment

  • “Poignantly, the child of one of the nerds (who was dressed as Cillian Murphy’s character in Sunshine) said he wanted to be either an astronaut, a paleontologist or a veterinarian when he grows up. He will be none of those things”

    Because you have a crystal ball? Because you think you get cool points for mocking a child?

    What the kid won’t be is a bitter disgruntled fool who disparages the aspirations of others.

  • As the Uber-geek father of the child mentioned above I am also appalled at the author’s comment, as well as the editor’s decision to publish it. Without any knowledge of the boy’s intelligence, interests, schooling or other credentials the author has decided to puncture the child’s optimism toward the future.

    My son is, in my opinion, quite bright, and has researched dinosaurs for over three years now. Yes, researched, not just watched “Jurassic Park”, or “Barney”. His knowledge of the subject is extensive, and far exceeds my own. I would put him into a challenge against any entry level college student in Paleontology and expect him to show quite well. He can quote Drs. Bakker, and Horner as well as debate their individual opinions on their most recent publicly discussed works. He has attended lectures by Dr. Jane Goodall and E.O. Wilson, as well as many other lectures for adults. We regularly visit the American Museum of Natural History and he has read dozens of books on paleontology, including some for high school age or above.

    With all that I can still understand that a seven year old’s desires for an occupation in the future is not set in stone and he may not get any of the three mentioned jobs. Nonetheless it does not make sense to me for the author to attack the child. I was quoted in that article as well, and in several others. Why not pick on the adult?

    All I can say to the author is that based on his above work, I can tell you that in my opinion when he grows up he won’t get a job as a journalist.

    Kevin

  • @ kmceject, disgusted
    You guys are right, I’m sorry… I’m sure the kid has every chance becoming any one of those things. I was really just reacting to the “central-casting/precocious kid” angle that the reporter chose to use