New York State Realizes Standardized Testing Is Meaningless

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07/20/2010 11:46 AM |

To make the tests more difficult, the state plans to place the (A), (B), (C) and (D) bubbles in a different order on each question.
  • To make the tests more difficult, the state plans to place the (A), (B), (C) and (D) bubbles in a different order on each question.

Or, no, wait. Same facts, different conclusion. New York state will recalibrate how it scores and composes its standardized tests, the Times reports, following its observation that rising test scores on state tests—which are given to 3rd and 8th graders and the scores of which play a large factor in school-funding formulas—haven’t corresponded to rising scores on other proficiency tests, like the Regents.

“The only possible conclusion is that something strange has happened to our test,” our state’s education commission is quoted as saying, apparently under the impression that “innovative,” “performance-based” federal and local education standards tying school money closely to test scores, leading to a system in which teachers are under immense pressure to simply “teach the test,” now count as strange.