Delicious Pie Chart Debunks Perceived Department of Transportation War on Cars

03/02/2011 8:57 AM |

New York City cyclists, as perceived by radical motorists.
  • New York City cyclists, as perceived by radical motorists.

Ask any of the few very vocal, often powerful opponents of new bike lanes around New York City and you’d probably get the impression that the Department of Transportation has banished cars to a few narrow streets between pedestrian plazas and two-way bike lanes.

But as Streetsblog points out with its sliver of a pie chart below, the street space that has been taken from motorists and given to cyclists, pedestrians and improved bus lanes since 2007 (or when popular anti-sustainable transportation advocate punching bag Janette Sadik-Khan took office as DoT commissioner) amounts to less than one half of one percent of the city’s total street square-footage.

Street reallocation in New York City between 2007 and 2011

The estimates behind the largely unchanged figures tend to be very generous, and of course assume mutual respect of areas set aside for cyclists and pedestrians by motorists:

In other words, the total amount of street space taken from cars and given to bikes, buses, and pedestrians under Janette Sadik-Khan equals less than one half of one percent of the city’s total network. And that’s with the generous assumption that on-street bike lanes and bus lanes aren’t constantly encroached upon by motor vehicles.

Try telling that to the opponents of the Prospect Park West bike lane.