Developers Attempt To Turn Bushwick Into A Dr. Seuss Book

03/30/2012 9:48 AM |

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Would you move here with a box? Would you live here with a fox? This is the newly unleashed Lavender Residence, located at 85 Cornelius Street. Curbed NY reports that developer Abe Green is responsible for the job, which isn’t surprising, given that he seems to have a sense of paint-by-numbers manifest destiny—Green is also the developer who brought the loud, checkered Ocean Blue Residence to Bushwick in 2010.

Yet, as silly as it looks, the history behind the Lavender Residence might point to something more sordid than Dr. Seuss: When the roof collapsed on the Cornelia Street rowhouse last summer, the FDNY determined the building unsafe and officials forced everyone to move out. Bushwick BK reported that residents were barred from returning, which allowed for renovation work to begin. The publication interviewed at least one resident whose story suggests deliberate neglect.

Luther “Dreads” Smith, a neighbor of 85 Cornelia, told BushwickBK that the owner told him he wanted to “move in yuppies” after everyone was evicted. The building is the only one on the block that is rent stabilized.

“They offered them money to buy them out and only the first- and second-floor tenants took it and moved out three weeks ago,” said Dreads. According to him, the 3rd floor tenants were the sole holdouts and refused to take the buy-out money offered by the landlord. [BushwickBK]

According to Dreads, the tenants who were forced to move “had kids and the floor was sagging after the collapse.” Ugh. Oh, the places you’ll go…when you’re evicted like this by your landlord.

[via Curbed NY]

You can follow Sydney Brownstone on Twitter @sydbrownstone

One Comment

  • This highlights the very important distinction between a legal eviction and a vacate order. If a city agency places a vacate order on your house, you may be required to leave for the duration of the vacate order. You have not been evicted. You still retain your tenancy rights. In order for the landlord to terminate your tenancy and evict you, he has to fulfill procedural requirements of notifying you and taking you to court, and thereby obtaining a judgment for possession at housing court.
    Unfortunately, where a landlord allows a vacate order to be placed because he did not do what was required to maintain the building, the tenants may not have anywhere else to relocate to. If the bldg is rent stabilized–probably is if built before 1974 and has six units–the tenant can file for a rent reduction order with the Division of Housing and Community Renewal and may be eligible to have the rent at the subject apartment reduced to $1.00/month while the vacate order is active.