Slicing Up an Artwork Dices Up a Theory at The Active Space

04/26/2012 2:41 PM |

At the closing party for Dreaming Without Sleeping, at The Active Space.
  • At the closing party for Dreaming Without Sleeping, at The Active Space.

After presiding over a great deal of construction work to renovate, polish and paint 1500 square feet of new exhibitional capacity at The Active Space, the creative force behind the gallery, Ashley Zelinskie, elected to inaugurate the rather rollingly roomy new room with a guest-curated exhibition.

Hence Dreaming Without Sleeping, a show of recent oil paintings by Criminy Johnson, otherwise known as street artist QRST. It was curated by Robin Grearson, otherwise known as a third-time guest curator at The Active Space.

Deconstructing an artwork very literally. With audience participation as well.
  • Deconstructing an artwork very literally. With audience participation as well.

The exhibit came down last weekend, yet still worth noting, given all the construction that preceded this first show in the new room, is the deconstructive process that took place at the closing party, during which Criminy—or rather QRST, in this act—took a hammer and saw to his 96-square-foot site-specific mural, Eidola, divided it up into so many custom-compositioned pieces and sold them, by and large, for a song.

Deconstruction needn’t only be in theory, as it were.

And it was an interesting way for Criminy to curtain-call QRST.

Or would that be vice-versa?

Anyway, below are a few photos of satisfied customers at the closing. Keep an eye out for lingering remnants of the mural during Bushwick Open Studios. Or maybe contact the curator to pre-order your favorite portion.

This gentlemans selected chunk, out of context, suggests quite different subject matter indeed.
  • This gentleman’s selected chunk, out of context, suggests quite different subject matter indeed.

Custom compositioning included gift-wrapping as well.
  • Custom compositioning included gift-wrapping as well.

Also of note: In the background is one of Criminys paintings, one which begs one to wonder if green could be any greener. Those frogs are so green they must be envious, too.
  • Also of note: In the background is one of Criminy’s paintings, one which begs one to wonder if green could be any greener. Those frogs are so green they must be envious, too.

You can follow Paul D’Agostino on Twitter (if you can forgive him for the envious frogs caption) @postuccio