RIP Monster Island (And Brooklyn DIY?) 

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LESLIE HONG, MUSICIAN AND MEMBER OF FEMINIST ARTS COLLECTIVE PERMANENT WAVE:

Do you have a favorite memory of a show you saw at Monster Island?
My endearingly awkward best friend is beyond obsessed with Animal Collective. Black Dice was playing at Monster Island ... and we were sweating our faces off in the dark corner that was the merch booth when she stepped outside to get some air. A few minutes later she came back supremely red in the face squawking that she pat Avey Tare on the head. Her face kept going through some odd mixtures of agitated, embarrassed and exuberant. It was great.

With Market Hotel and Monster Island now closed, not to mention the recent troubles Silent Barn has faced, there's been some talk about the death of Brooklyn's DIY scene. Do you feel as though it's as vibrant as it once was?
I always thought that DIY meant "do it yourself," and there are still tons of people who are "doing it" and doing it hard and daily. Friends are always putting on basement shows and warehouse parties, and Jim Bentley started Party Xpo for the joy of it, making no profit. Music-lovers will always find a way. Maybe the reign of Todd is coming to a close, but the scene is definitely not dying.

SOPHIE WEINER, PERMANENT WAVE MEMBER:

Do you have a favorite memory of a show you saw at Monster Island?
Two Monster Island shows stand out for me. One was Tanlines about a year and an half ago. It was a really great lineup — Lemonade, Pictureplane and Brahms also played. By the time Tanlines came on, the place was totally packed and everyone was dancing and sweaty and having an amazing time. My other favorite show was seeing Dustin Wong from the recently broken-up Ponytail play this spring. His live shows are always incredible, but this one was particularly so: The crowd was totally silent, obviously mesmerized by the performance, but still totally engaged.

With Market Hotel and Monster Island now closed, not to mention the recent troubles Silent Barn has faced, there's been some talk about the death of Brooklyn's DIY scene. Do you feel as though it's as vibrant as it once was?
The closing of Market Hotel, and now Monster Island and Silent Barn, is forcing people to come up with new, creative ways to continue booking shows. I think it's led to a greater diversity of people putting on shows in different locations and more people offering up their own apartments and roofs to host [them]. People are starting to use the DIY model to further their own causes. ... Most of the DIY scene feels somewhat apolitical, so it's cool to see people blending activism and music. Overall, I think this is a turning point for the scene, but there are so many creative people here with so much drive to do awesome things, I don't think this scene is in danger of dying.

If not, does that bum you out, or do you chalk it up to the natural progression of any so-called music scene?
Silent Barn getting shut down definitely bummed me out big time, but seeing the amazing, massive success of their Kickstarter campaign and all of the energy and support they've received is super inspiring. It's awesome to see, in a measurable way, all the community you could always sense in that venue and throughout the DIY scene.

HEIDI VANDERLEE, PERMANENT WAVE SHOW BOOKER:

With Market Hotel and Monster Island now closed, not to mention the recent troubles Silent Barn has faced, there's been some talk about the death of Brooklyn's DIY scene. Do you feel as though it's as vibrant as it once was?
Obviously, Death by Audio and Shea Stadium are alive and well. Both are rad and supportive places to do shows. Right from the beginning, Death by Audio was super flexible with letting Permanent Wave transform the space with our art, music and baked goods, making our first sound wave (a benefit for the Center Against Domestic Violence) a huge success. When those spaces aren't available, people put on great shows in their own houses, which has been happening for years anyway. While spaces like Silent Barn are getting reborn, I think that other lesser-known spots are getting their chances to shine. Yeah, it sucks that two of the best DIY spaces were taken from us, but what it's really helping us do is find new spaces and meet more people.

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